Pollution Reductions Mean Healthier, Longer Lives and Financial Gains

By path2positive

What would America pay to prevent 300,000 lives in the next 15 years? You may, instead, want to turn this question around to ask: How much would America save? It turns out that, although there would be some upfront costs, savings over the long term would significantly exceed expenditure. Here's how we do it, say colleagues in a recently published report in Nature Climate Change: we follow through with our Paris climate conference commitments. Health institutions can play their part by pursing the switch to renewable energy, to name one major climate action that is certain to be effective.

"If the US pursued the switch to electric cars and renewable energy, hundreds of thousands of premature deaths could be prevented − not just by containing global warming and limiting the extent of climate change, but by the consequent reduction in soot, aerosols and ozone, all of which are pollutants with consequences for health," as Climate News Network reports below.

Climate for Health's leaders understand the significance of health care's involvement in the climate movement. Find out more about us, and how you can contribute.


Clean Energy is Win-Win for the US

Climate News Network

By Tim Radford I March 13, 2016

Scientists have worked out how the US could save as many as 300,000 lives by 2030, and get a tenfold return on its investments at the same time.

It’s simple. All the nation has to do is what it promised to do at the Paris climate conference last December − launch clean energy and transport policies, reduce greenhouse gas emissions by two-thirds or more, and pursue the international goal of keeping global warming to below 2°C.

Drew Shindell, professor of climate sciences at Duke University, North Carolina, and colleagues report in Nature Climate Change that the climate policies agreed by 195 nations at the latest UN summit on climate change deliver a winning scenario for the most powerful nation on Earth.

If the US pursued the switch to electric cars and renewable energy, hundreds of thousands of premature deaths could be prevented − not just by containing global warming and limiting the extent of climate change, but by the consequent reduction in soot, aerosols and ozone, all of which are pollutants with consequences for health.

Read more

Subscribe

Stay connected and get updates from Climate for Health.

Subscribe

You May Also Like

December 1, 2020

ecoAmerica’s most recent contribution to the National Environmental Health Association’s Journal of Environmental Health was published in the December 2020 issue, “Ambition, Restoration, and Justice:...

Read More

November 25, 2020

In a recent opinion piece in Scientific American, Drs. Howard Frumkin and Richard J. Jackson make the case for creating a National Institute of Climate Change...

Read More

November 23, 2020

Since moving away from California eight years ago, I’ve longed to come back home. I spent the first 18 years of my life in the...

Read More
climate-for-helth-logo-white

 

Climate for Health is a program of ecoAmerica

 

© ecoAmerica 2006 – 2020 The contents of this website may be shared and used under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives 4.0 International License.