Sneezing and Wheezing? Climate Solutions May Mean Allergy Relief

By path2positive

The consequences of climate change are so tremendous that they impact oceans and weather patterns, droughts and deluges. How is it that climate impacts can also be individualized? For the millions of patients across the country that suffer from allergies, climate change has become a personal health issue. As the St. Louis American reports below, Dr. Huldah Blamoville of the Mound City Medical explains, pollen production increases as carbon dioxide concentrations and temperatures rise. A recent national study of African-American physicians conducted by George Mason University and the National Medical Association -- both Climate for Health partners -- showed that "88 percent of physicians surveyed are seeing health effects of climate change in their patients." Medical professionals have all the reason in the world to fight for climate solutions and clean air. In fact, working on climate solutions is preventing the worsening of many environmental allergies. Best of all, Climate for Health has a network of leaders in the field who are already working on these issues. Find out more by taking a minute to join our team.


Climate Change Makes Allergies Worse

The St. Louis American

By Dr. Huldah Blamoville I June 11, 2015

Share on facebook Share on twitter Share on pinterest_share More Sharing Services 1

By Dr. Huldah Blamoville | Posted 5 days ago

Climate change is making our patients sicker.

As physicians of the Mound City Medical Forum, the Missouri affiliate of the National Medical Association, we are concerned how climate change is causing us to have to provide more asthma and allergy medication to our patients at younger and younger ages. 

As many suffer through allergy season, you may not be surprised to learn that allergenic pollen production increases as carbon dioxide concentrations and temperatures climb. Additionally, carbon pollution that causes climate change is linked to childhood asthma attacks, cardio vascular disease and other respiratory illnesses.

We are not alone.  A recent national study of African-American physicians conducted by George Mason University and the National Medical Association – the leading voice for African-American physicians in the United States – showed that 88 percent of physicians surveyed are seeing health effects of climate change in their patients.

In this part of the Midwest, we have seen the ragweed pollen season increase by about two weeks. This, coupled with high ozone air pollution, is why the St. Louis area has been named a climate-vulnerable zone in a new report from the Natural Resources Defense Council, “Sneezing and Wheezing, How Climate Change Could Increase Ragweed Allergies, Air Pollution and Asthma.” 

Read more

 

Subscribe

Stay connected and get updates from Climate for Health.

Subscribe

You May Also Like

September 23, 2020

On September 22, 2020, the first day of autumn, an equinox occurred marking when the sun passed directly over the earth’s equator. Prior to and...

Read More

September 22, 2020

In the present moment, and mere days before World Environmental Health Day on September 26, the intersection between climate change and preparedness is, sadly, quite...

Read More

September 20, 2020

In the midst of a global pandemic, with climate disasters raging across the country, many Americans are laser focused on one date: November 3. “The...

Read More
climate-for-helth-logo-white

 

Climate for Health is a program of ecoAmerica

 

© ecoAmerica 2006 – 2020 The contents of this website may be shared and used under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives 4.0 International License.