The Primary Reason We Should Avoid Fracking

By path2positive

A new report by the Yale School of Public Health reveals more than 200 toxins can be found in fracking fluids and wastewater, in addition to other substances which remain undisclosed by fracking companies.

As Lynne Peeples reports in the Huffington Post below, "Of the 240 chemicals for which the Yale team did have adequate data, they found that 157 were associated with some kind of reproductive or developmental problem, such as adverse birth outcomes, derailed brain development or infertility. And, of course, these health concerns come in addition to worries over air pollution, noise, greenhouse gas emissions and even earthquakes, which have also been linked to fracking."

Though industry asserts there is nothing in the study that shows people are actually exposed to these harmful chemicals, we know the potential exists and have enough information to act. Health professionals and their institutions can take an active role in promoting the use clean energy sources free of pollution and therefore avoid potential illness. That's our responsibility, after all.


Fracking Fluid Contains A Stew Of Known Toxic Chemicals -- And That May Not Be The Worst Of It

Huffington Post

By Lynne Peeples I January 6, 2016

Arsenic, benzene, formaldehyde, lead and mercury are among more than 200 toxins found in fracking fluids and wastewater that may pose serious risks to reproductive and developmental health, according to a paper published on Wednesday.

And that list may just be just the tip of the iceberg, said Nicole Deziel, an environmental health expert at the Yale School of Public Health and senior author of the new study.

Many more chemicals known to be used in fracking could pose similar risks, yet remain unstudied, Deziel said. Other substances involved in oil and natural gas production remain undisclosed by fracking companies. 

In their study, Deziel and her team investigated more than 1,000 chemicals used in and created by the controversial drilling process, which shoots a mix of pressurized water, sand and chemicals into shale rock to unlock hydrocarbon reserves. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency used the same list in its assessment of the available science, which found no evidence that fracking has led to widespread, systemic contamination of drinking water. 

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