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Climate change is an issue that is increasingly impacting the health of our population, as we see the far-reaching and sometimes drastic effects take hold.

Surili Patel

This post first appeared on APHA's Public Health Newswire 

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Our research and experience tell us the best way to inspire broad engagement and public support on climate across a large swath of Americans is to connect the issues to them personally.

We don't want you to miss a thing when it comes to climate and health news.

An air of determination and energetic comradery filled the Jimmy Carter Center in Atlanta this February, when nearly 350 academics, climate scientists, physicians, nurses, and public and environmental health professionals transferred their RSVPs from an abruptly cancelled, three-day CDC event to a rapidly reconfigured, jam-packed, one-day national Climate & Health Meeting.

Nurses gathered at ANHE's 2016 Climate Change, Health, and Nursing White House Summit.

Nurses’ trusted role, and their place on the front lines of health care and disaster response in every community, places them in a unique position to inform and mobilize society to act on climate change. Now ecoAmerica and the Climate for Health leadership community will be combining forces with ANHE to build support for climate solutions.

 

 

 

 

What happened in climate and health news this week? We've got the answers.

Many professional organizations are already educating their members on issues related to climate change. But given its impacts on the communities they serve—and even their own jobs—how well are these groups integrating climate change prevention, preparedness, and social equity into their work? And what might help them to do it better? A new report offers insights.

We've got news you can use, but may have missed last week.

Dr. Richard Jackson believes it is the responsibility of science and scientists to serve not just as purveyors but interpreters of facts, identifying and communicating the underlying causes of a problem – be it severe weather or human health conditions.