New Let’s Talk Climate Episode Now Available: “The Heat is On”

By Bruce Bekkar, MD

Extreme weather takes many forms: massive hurricanes, overwhelming floods, prolonged and severe droughts- but few are as harmful to as many as extreme heat. We know that high temperatures hurt some more than others: outdoor workers, those in urban heat islands, people without access to air conditioning, or those with medical conditions like asthma and cardiopulmonary disease; recent evidence also suggests heat is linked to bad birth outcomes. 

In this episode of Let’s Talk Climate, we hear from Dr. Sergio Rimola of the National Hispanic Medical Association, which represents 50,000 latino physicians across the US. Join us and hear his perspective on dealing with the heat, from how to counsel patients at risk to how to advocate effectively in our communities for policies to address climate change, turn down these temperatures, and make life better for all.

WATCH NOW

Additional Resources

Heat Wave- Posters & Handouts

Severe Weather Drives Climate Concerns

National Hispanic Medical Association

Climate for Health Ambassador Training 

More Americans Are Concerned About Climate Change Than You Think

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