Two Climate for Health Leadership Circle Members Call for a National Institute of Climate Change and Health

By Rebecca Rehr

In a recent opinion piece in Scientific American, Drs. Howard Frumkin and Richard J. Jackson make the case for creating a National Institute of Climate Change and Health. “It would deliver needed insights to protect the public from the ravages of climate change, and it would create a world-class research workforce.”

We know that climate change is impacting our health now, and we must implement ambitious and equitable climate solutions. A new National Institutes of Health could provide guidance and research dollars to inform sound policy, and explore under-resourced topics like mental health impacts and quantification of co-benefits to health from clean energy and energy efficiency  initiatives. Importantly, a National Institute of Climate Change and Health would support young doctors and researchers build careers in climate and health.

Read the full piece here.

 

Drs. Howard Frumkin and Richard J. Jackson are both members of the the Climate for Health Leadership Circle.

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